Say What?

 

  These days, I am much more of a massage consumer than a massage provider. As a consumer, I know what I like (no cold bananas, remember?), and I regularly see a favorite therapist as well as occasional new practitioners. It’s always interesting getting a massage from a new practitioner (new to me, not brand-new). In my case—and I’m sure some of you face this dilemma as well—I always wonder if I should mention I am a therapist, or if I should mention my affiliation with ABMP.   I usually leave the therapist/ABMP info out and stick to my middle-aged, running, hockey-player, dad narrative. One reason: I wouldn’t want the therapist thinking, “Wow, the President of ABMP really needs to get more massage!”   Drawing this line also limits the possibility of getting in too deep of a conversation. I am a 10-minute guy; I am willing to spend up to 10 minutes having conversation at the beginning of my session, but then I shut down (sometimes by simply falling asleep). Even with my regular therapist, my pal Angie—I tune out after 10 minutes.   Do you have a quiet-time guideline as a therapist? What about as a client? Any good tips to share with other professionals on quieting clients, or keeping yourself quiet?   Road to Boston: Week 16 My return to training is going slow. Between my time off, tweaking my left calf (that dang soleus is a chronic challenge for me), and a bout of wintry Colorado weather (there are three settings: cold; windy; cold and windy), my mojo has not quite returned to pre-illness levels. And I am starting to be more cognizant of how quickly time is passing. February and March will determine how my April 15th will be spent.   Care to receive more from Les, but in smaller bites? Follow him on Twitter at @abmp_les.  
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