3 Tips for Massage Therapists: Email Marketing

In a survey about using technology in one’s massage practice, 28 percent of ABMP members told us that they used email to send marketing messages to clients and potential clients. In another survey, 56 percent of members said they would like more clients.

I think those two numbers are at least somewhat related, and I think it’s possible to change them. I know it can seem intimidating, but I believe you can start using email to market your massage practice without finding the situation overwhelming. Try the following pieces of advice.

Have a Plan and Stick to It

You don’t have to send an email every week unless you call it a “weekly email.” Create a schedule that you know you can meet and set yourself up for success. That might mean a broadcast email to your list once a month, or it might mean automated appointment follow-ups or new client welcome emails. Your plan might be different if you’re an independent practitioner with a full practice or someone starting out looking to build your clientele.

Take the time to think about your clients and what you want their experience of your email program to be, then consider what commitment you’re able to make to it. It doesn’t have to be elaborate, it just has to fit your situation.

Have a Goal and Write to It

When it comes to creating individual emails within your plan, answer this question before you think about sending an email: “Why am I sending this?” You need a clear goal to inform the content you’re creating and the action you’re asking a client to take as a result. Here are some examples:

“I want to remind clients that I am here for them and that I have openings available.” The call to action in this scenario is clear—openings available, book today!—and it provides an opportunity to further engage with your clients by providing context as to why massage and bodywork supports a healthy lifestyle. Consider sharing an article from ABMP’s Body Sense magazine at www.bodysensemagazinedigital.com.

“I want my current clients to spread the word by sharing my website or writing a review.” Where I go for massage (Shout out to www.lodomassagestudio.com!), they send a thank-you email after my session with a link to leave a review on Yelp and other review sites. They’re responding to a behavior I just took, catching me at a time when I’m likely feeling good about my decision to go there, and asking me to complete a specific behavior that will help them succeed.

You should avoid sending an email simply because you feel you have to do so. If you always start with a specific goal in mind, you’ll have a better chance of sending something that gets results.

The Best Email Program is Whatever You Use on a Regular Basis

It is important to find an email program that fits your needs, because a program that you use is worth infinitely more than a program you don’t. Here are a few suggestions to get started:

If you’re ready to do it yourself:

MailChimp is free to use up to a certain number of subscribers, and it’s a good way to get started if you’ve never sent email before. Also, ABMP members save on the do-it-yourself Constant Contact option at www.abmp.com/members/business-management/discounts-and-resources/discounts#practice-management-and-marketing-tools.

If you’re looking for more guidance:

ABMP members save on MassageBook’s practice management solution that includes easy-to-use email campaigns and massage-specific email templates. There’s even an “autopilot” feature that you can use to encourage repeat bookings. You can learn more at www.massagebook.com/marketing/pricing/#pricing-abmp.

If you’re in the 56 percent of ABMP members who would like more clients, but also the 72 percent who aren’t using email marketing, I hope these suggestions help!

Get More Marketing Tips from These CE Opportunities in the ABMP Education Center:

“Yes, You Can Market Your Practice: Essential Marketing Skills Made Easy” with Kristin Coverly

“Social Trigger Points: Massage Therapist’s Guide to Marketing Online” with Stephanie Beck

ABMP Certified Members OnlyLet Technology Improve Your Practice

—Jed Heneberry is ABMP’s director of marketing.

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